An introduction to the aztecs

Later Spanish colonial administrations largely dismissed Mesoamerican cultural achievements, while dispossessing them of their lands, languages, and heritage. Conquest was also aided by the diseases the Spanish introduced for which indigenous Americans had no immunity.

An introduction to the aztecs

Introduction to the Aztec Calendar Not just one calendar There is not just one Aztec calendar, there are two more or less independent systems.

One calendar, called the xiuhpohualli, has days. It describes the days and rituals related to the seasons, and therefor might be called the agricultural year or the solar year. The other calendar has days. In Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs, it is called the tonalpohualli or, the day-count.

Most information on this website refers to the tonalpohualli, which is the sacred calendar. Depicts the 20 daysigns around the Sun God. The tonalpohualli, or day-count, has been called a sacred calendar because its main purpose is that of a divinatory tool.

It divides the days and rituals between the gods. For the Aztec mind this is extremely important. Without it the world would soon come to an end. According to Aztec cosmology, the universe is in a very delicate equilibrium.

Conquest of Mexico

Opposing divine forces are competing for power. This equilibrium is in constant danger of being disrupted by shifting powers of the gods, of the elemental forces that influence our lives.

This struggle cannot be won by any god. The notion that everything ultimately consists of two opposing forces is essential to the Aztec worldview. The world is always on the brink of going under in a spiritual war, a war of gods competing for supreme power.

To prevent this from happening, the gods have been given their own space, their own time, their own social groups, etcetera, to rule over.

An introduction to the aztecs

The tonalpohualli tells us how time is divided among the gods. The system of the tonalpohualli The system of the tonalpohualli can be best understood by imagining two wheels that are connected to each other.

One wheel has the numbers "one" to "thirteen" written on it. The second wheel has twenty symbols on it. In the initial situation, number "one" combines with the first symbol. This is the first day of the tonalpohualli. Now the wheels start moving and number "two" combines with the second glyph.

This is the second day. After fourteen days, an Aztec week trecena in Spanish of thirteen days has passed. The wheel with the numbers shows number "one" again.

The other wheel now shows the fourteenth symbol. After days, the two wheels have returned to their initial position. The tonalpohualli starts all over again. Dividing time among gods A day tonalli in the tonalpohualli consists of a number and a symbol or daysign.

Each daysign is dedicated to a god or elemental force, the provider of tonalli Shadow Soul life energy for the day.Introduction to the Aztec Calendar Not just one calendar.

There is not just one Aztec calendar, there are two more or less independent systems. One calendar, called the xiuhpohualli, has days.

It describes the days and rituals related to the seasons, and therefor might be called the agricultural year or . Aztec history search Check out the Aztec history search, your place to find information about the Aztec empire, its culture and its people The Aztec Empire.

The Aztecs (/ ˈ æ z t ɛ k s /) were a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico in the post-classic period from to The Aztec peoples included different ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

Aztec culture was organized into city-states. The thirty “booted” eagles, so-called because feathers grow down the legs and cover the toes, include the widest-ranging eagle of them all: the Golden Eagle, which is found around the world.

Pupils could use the images of the Aztec temples shown in the clip as source material to help them construct their own models.

You could task individuals and groups to make models of each of the buildings shown. Children could use plastic construction bricks, or build their models from cardboard.

An introduction to the aztecs

During the twelfth century C.E. the Aztec (or Mexica*) were a small and obscure tribe searching for a new homeland.

Eventually they settled in the Valley of Mexico and founded their capital, Tenochtitlan, in At the beginning of the sixteenth century it was one of the largest cities in the world.

Aztec (Mexica), an introduction (article) | Khan Academy