Who is your audience when writing an essay

Writing for an Audience Learn how to identify your audience and craft your writing to meet their needs. Imagine that you recently had a car accident and you were partially responsible. If you had to write and tell your parents about the accident, what might you say?

Who is your audience when writing an essay

Writing for an Audience Learn how to identify your audience and craft your writing to meet their needs.

Prewriting

Imagine that you recently had a car accident and you were partially responsible. If you had to write and tell your parents about the accident, what might you say?

Imagine how you might tell the story differently if you were telling your friends about what happened. How might this version be different from the one you tell the insurance company?

What details would you emphasize? Are there some details you might tell your friends that you might not emphasize or even mention at all in your letter to your parents or the insurance company? Would the order in which you told the various details be different?

As you can see, this illustrates the way that we customize our writing to appeal to a specific audience. Assignments are often designed with a particular audience in mind. For example, if you are writing a business or legal memo, your intended audience is probably people with whom you work, perhaps your boss or your co-workers.

Who is your audience when writing an essay

If you are writing a proposal of some sort, the intended audience may be a professional but not someone with whom you are intimately acquainted. Just as what you say to your parents and friends might be different than what you say to the insurance company, what and how you report information may vary depending on the audience.

Why is My Audience Important? Knowing your audience helps you to make decisions about what information you should include, how you should arrange that information, and what kind of supporting details will be necessary for the reader to understand what you are presenting.

The Writing Process: Determining Audience - Aims Community College Prewriting Targeting Your Audience No matter what type of writing you are doing, you should plan to write to someone—that is, you should target an audience for your writing assignment.

It also influences the tone and structure of the document. To develop and present an effective argument, you need to be able to appeal to and address your audience. When writing an academic paper, try to remember that your instructor is not the only member of your audience.

Although the instructor is often the only person who will read the finished product, customizing a paper to his or her level of knowledge can run the risk of leaving out important information, since many instructors know far more about your topic than the average reader would.

In addition, omitting information that your instructor already knows can result in a weak or unbalanced paper. However, if you assume that your reader is less knowledgeable than you, you are likely to provide more details and better explanations, which usually results in a much stronger paper.

To effectively plan your assignment, you need to figure out who your audience is and what specific needs they might have. The best place to begin is your assignment description. Look to see if your instructor specified an intended audience. If not, you might ask your instructor if there is a particular intended reader for the assignment.

Common audiences include the following: Generalized Group of Readers: Sometimes your audience is just a generalized group of readers. For example, your assignment might specify something like this: These readers will need you to provide some background information, as well as examples and illustrations to help them understand what you are presenting.

Professionals in the field: Sometimes your assignment might require you to address people within a particular field or profession. For example, a business assignment might specify the audience as other business professionals in the field.

Likewise, for a legal memo, your readers might be a group of legal experts. If your readers are professional peers, you can assume they know the jargon and terminology common to that field. These readers may also expect you to write in the style and vocabulary that is common to the field or discipline.

If your writing is designed for people with whom you work, you might be able to assume that they are also knowledgeable about the particular project or topic you are writing about.Knowing your audience will also help you to decide on the “voice” to use.

The writer's voice is a literary term used to describe the individual writing style of an author but also includes how formal or informal (relaxed) the tone of voice should be.

Although your instructor may be your audience for an essay, he or she may also expect you to write for your classmates or others in your field of study.

In addition to knowing who your audience is, you must understand the purpose of your writing. Writing for Your Audience. (when writing an essay for a teacher).

Who is your audience when writing an essay

Or you might be trying to show how organized and creative you are (if your audience is your boss) and you've written a problem. Thinking about your audience differently can improve your writing, especially in terms of how clearly you express your argument.

Five Steps for Persuasive Writing

The clearer your points are, the more likely you are to have a strong essay. Knowing your audience will also help you to decide on the “voice” to use. The writer's voice is a literary term used to describe the individual writing style of an author but also includes how formal or informal (relaxed) the tone of voice should be.

Remember, in writing, the audience is who you are writing for. If you know who you are writing for, you can make good decisions about what information to include, as well as your tone and language.

Targeting Your Audience