Writing a direct style memo

Title of Memo in Initial Capitals Engineers and scientists use memos to make requests, to give announcements, and sometimes to communicate reports. Memos that make requests or announcements are read quickly.

Writing a direct style memo

A business memo is a short document used to transmit information within an organization. Memos are characterized by being brief, direct, and easy to navigate. They are less formal than letters but should maintain a professional, succinct style. Often, the purpose of a business memo is twofold: Other times, memos may provide or request factual information.

Business memos are designed to accommodate busy readers who want to find the information they need from the memo quickly and easily.

In writing a business memo, you should structure your memo to accommodate three kinds of readers: Those who read only the executive summary Those who skim the entire memo for its key points and a few details they're interested in Those who read the entire document for the details that support its major claims or recommendations Bear in mind that these readers may have different purposes in reading the memo.

Often, readers need to make policy and action decisions based on the recommendations. Others may want to obtain specific information evidence needed to understand and justify policy and action decisions. Readers may also want to get a sense of your professional ability and judgment.

In determining the purpose and audience of your memo, ask yourself: Who is the intended recipient of this memo? What do I want the recipient to do after reading the memo? What information will the recipient be looking for in the memo? These kinds of questions will help guide your content, structure, and style choices.

As stated above, an effective business memo is brief, direct, and easy to navigate. The following five writing strategies help readers to navigate business memos easily and quickly: Present the main point first.

This may be the single most important guideline about the structure and content of memos. Readers should quickly grasp the content and significance of the memo. If readers have a question or problem, they want to know the answer or solution immediately—if readers want more information, they can continue reading.

In other words, supporting details should follow the main point or conclusion, not precede it. Maintain a professional, succinct style. The style of your writing should be appropriate to your audience: In this case, your audience is your boss, your coworkers, or both.

writing a direct style memo

So, your style should be professional, straightforward, cordial, and easy to read. To achieve such a style, use short, active sentences. Avoid jargon and pretentious language. Maintain a positive or neutral tone; avoid negative language if possible.

Create a very specific subject line to give the reader an immediate idea of the memo's or message's subject and purpose. The subject line should orient the reader to the subject and purpose of the memo and provide a handy reference for filing and quick review.

Suppose, for instance, that you were writing to request authorization and funding for a business trip. You'd avoid a general subject line like "Publisher's Convention" or "Trip to AWP Conference" in favor of something more specific like "Request for funds: Provide a summary or overview of the main points, especially if the memo is more than one page.

Often referred to as an executive summary, the first paragraph of a long memo or message serves these functions: Presents the main request, recommendation or conclusion Summarizes then previews the main facts, arguments and evidence Forecasts the structure and order of information presented in the remainder of the memo Like the subject line, the executive summary provides a quick overview of the purpose and content of the memo.

The reader uses it to guide both a quick first reading and subsequent rapid reviews.The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue.

In functional programming, continuation-passing style (CPS) is a style of programming in which control is passed explicitly in the form of a grupobittia.com is contrasted with direct style, which is the usual style of programming.

Gerald Jay Sussman and Guy L. Steele, Jr. coined the phrase in AI Memo (), which sets out the first version of the Scheme programming language. Sample Direct Memo. Sample Indirect Memo. Style and Tone. While memo reports and policy memos are examples of documents that have a more formal tone, most memos will have a conversational style—slightly informal but still professional.

In a standard writing format, we might expect to see an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. All these are present in a memo, and each part has a clear purpose. The declaration in the opening uses a declarative sentence to announce the main topic.

Style at Staples is a custom selection of desktop organizers and writing accessories curated from the lineups of leading popular brands.

This exclusive collection includes products from a handful of rising and established companies producing well-designed and high-quality office supplies. A memo’s format is typically informal (but still all-business) and public.

Memos typically make announcements, discuss procedures, report on company activities, and .

Directives Division